Criticism and Patriotism

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Franciscan friar Richard Rohr recently wrote, “Prophets can deeply love their tradition and profoundly criticize it at the same time, which is a very rare art form. In fact, it is their love of its depths that forces them to criticize their own religion.” Their criticism was not always welcome. As Rohr explains, “Institutions prefer loyalists and ‘company men’ to prophets. We’re uncomfortable with people who point out our shadow or imperfections.”

We’re seeing this a lot today. There are local, national, and global problems which are being kicked down the road because no one likes to hear about them. Here in the United States we have problems with infrastructure, racism, immigration, homelessness, poverty, and both illegal and legal substance abuse, just to name a few. Compared to other developed nations, the US rates poorly when it comes to incarceration rates, income inequality, infant mortality, and gun violence. The Left and the Right disagree on how to deal with these problems, but almost everyone agrees on the reality of them.

Unfortunately, anyone bringing these problems up is likely to be met with cries of “Unpatriotic!” This is an unproductive response. Patriotism is not shrugging off things that need fixing, patriotism Is confronting them and trying to fix them. Patriotism is recognizing that your country could be better, and wanting to help make it so. (Note: This is NOT the same thing as wishing to return to a mythical past golden age.)

The prophets are still with us. They cry out, wanting to be heard. But when the government quickly labels any criticism “fake news,” and does all in its power to silence the press and discredit experts, it does a disservice to the nation and its citizens.

Tomorrow is Independence Day. The true patriots will not be the people and organizations trying to hide the nation’s ills under flags, and certainly not under Confederate flags. True patriots love their country enough to criticize it. Will we listen?